M.Arch Courses

M.Arch Track I Pre-professional Required Courses
M.Arch Track II Prerequisite Courses 

EDAD 510 Architectural Design I
As a first architectural design studio designed to provide a basis in architecture and interior architecture, students are introduced to program and layout, access systems, siting, and elementary building systems including foundations, stick frame construction, and roof framing. Through a series of projects of increasing complexity, students work on designs that include small scale private and public programs.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD200 Pattern Language, EDAD102 Architectural Technical Drawing, and EDAD202 Methods and Materials

EDAD 517 Architectural Structures I
Introduces construction at a domestic scale through lectures, slides, and field trips. Structural calculations include safe selection of building parts by stress analysis, beam equations, and column computations. Students learn sufficient wood and masonry building techniques to design a small wood frame building. Assignments include structural models and calculations.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisites: None

EDAD 502 Methods and Materials
This course introduces students to the origins, properties, working methods, and assembly techniques of the major materials that comprise the built environment with a focus on the development of woodshop skills and wood frame construction.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in EDAD200 Pattern Language

EDAD 516 History of Architecture and Urban Planning I
The course examines building cultures from different periods and places, beginning with pre-history and ancient civilizations from more than 5000 years ago that kept the first written records, through the era of medievalism up to the dawn of modernity. Emphasis is given to different aspects of the built domain: selected individual buildings, their symbolical significance, layouts, spatial organization, construction, building materials and technologies, along with buildings' sites and city plans within the broader urban and cultural landscapes. Each lecture is based on a variety of case studies of buildings and settlements explored within their specific geographies and historical settings. Rather than asking for simple memorizing of particular data or dates, students develop skills of analyzing, comparing, and getting oriented within distinct historical spaces and periods.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: None

EDAD 520 Architectural Design II
The studio focuses on the development of tools and fundamental skills for primary competence in design leading to an emerging ability to integrate design explorations—the ability to think critically about and integrate research and precedents, climate and site, program, use and structural building propositions.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD223 or EDAD305 Architectural Design I or equivalent as approved by instructor

EDAD 527 Architectural Structures II
This course continues structural design of wooden buildings and computations for generic or special extra load applications requiring compound wood sections. The course introduces steel construction and calculation for steel beams and columns and environmental systems of plumbing, heating, and insulation. Students will design a domestic plumbing system. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD227 Architectural Structures I, or equivalent as approved by instructor

EDAD 518 Revit I and II
This course begins by teaching the basic elements of the Autodesk Revit software. Students learn the program's 2D/3D parametric modeling features and complete a simplified small-scale design project, then progress to the basics of 3D computer modeling and rendering in architectural projects.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: previous experience with modeling and other programming recommended, but not required.

EDAD 526 History of Architecture and Urban Planning II
Students examine the idea of man-centered built environments, concepts, understanding, and architectural manifestations, from Renaissance through the mid-20th Century through case studies and comparative analysis. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD216 History of Architecture & Urban Planning I

EDAD 530 Architectural Design III
Students are exposed to a design project of increasing complexity and scale including an investigation of mixed use programming within the same or related buildings, experimentation with the design and selection of their own structural systems, and application of sustainable principles to their design concepts and details. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD310 Architectural Design II or equivalent as approved by instructor. (This studio is required of all undergraduates and graduates in the program)

EDAD 537 Architectural Structures III
Introduces structure design of compound steel beams and columns and long span trusses of steel or wood. Environmental systems/building science topics include electricity, wiring, lighting and daylighting, long span roofing, and foundation and site methods. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD317 Architectural Structures II, or equivalent as approved by instructor

EDAD 532 Sustainable Architecture
Providing a broad overview of ecology and landscape as a basis for understanding sustainable principles, the course follows research focusing on "deep retrofit" detailing for new and existing wood frame housing in various climates, with an emphasis on cold climates similar to New England. Lectures include siting, water and waste, trash and recycling, conservation and energy production, air, environment and health, materials and methods in construction, transportation, food production, native landscape design, and the broader issues of building community. Sustainable construction principles centered in wood frame construction for both new and existing housing presented and researched including the current developments in details, environmental, and energy systems alternatives. Individually and in groups, students are required to develop details for existing construction approaching zero-energy use in various climates, associated with an outline specification indicating materials, systems, and energy sources. Each student will complete a drawn presentation, an individual outline specification, and a short presentation on a focused area of interest.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisites: EDAD223 Architectural Design I, or equivalent as approved by instructor

EDAD 535 Professional Practice I
Students are introduced to the issues of architectural practice through social and community design issues, fiduciary responsibility, design and construction contracts and contract law, regulations and codes governing design and construction, ethics, sustainability and environmental issues and requirements for planning, site design, and building design, and construction.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD320 Architectural Design III (required of all graduates in the program) Permission of instructor required of students in the undergraduate program.

M.Arch Track I Additional Required Courses
M.Arch Track II Required Courses
 

EDAD 605 Community Build Studio
This studio is a design/build intensive focusing on a design problem with a community partner to provide the opportunity for students to design and construct a project as a full time experience in a single summer. This includes developing empathy for and sensitivity to the requirements of a community client through interviews, site observation, and measuring, programming, and presentation, while being exposed to specifications, budgeting, cost-control strategies, scheduling of a project from design through construction, and developing construction documents. The studio is set up as a collaborative experience in which the students direct a design and construction process with engineers, landscape architects, and other professionals in the community. Students design systems of assembly in wood, metal, and concrete, in a context that encourages a thoughtful approach to sustainable materials selection and reuse. As the work progresses through construction, students develop design and artisanry skills and are exposed to community building and leadership, with the hands-on experience of engineering and building systems.

EDAD 702 Architectural Design VII
Design studio with a complex, multi-storied program in an urban site, in which students integrate a site analysis with an historical context, public space and select structural systems and enclosure, and the development of sustainable systems integration relevant for planning neighborhoods and communities in the Boston area. Students analyze urban and historical site and building precedents, select and design steel and concrete frame systems that support their project concept, site and proposed uses, develop typical wall sections illustrating an understanding of fire separation assemblies, sustainable building envelope systems, and hone graphic design skills in their presentations. 

Graduate Prerequisite: EDAD605 Community Build Studio

EDAD 547 Structures IV
Introduces structural design of three-hinged arches and concrete buildings including computations for safe selection of beams, joists, slabs, and columns. Environmental systems/building science topics include active and passive solar design, HVAC, acoustics, fire alarm, sprinkler, security and elevators, concrete methods, and critical path method job planning. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD327 Architectural Structures III, or equivalent as approved by instructor

EDAD 711 Making Cities Work: Urban Landscape Systems and The Public Realm
What design decisions lead to a more sustainable future and how are those decisions made? The space between buildings-a city's parks, urban gardens and greenways, and infrastructures of water, transportation, and communication are integral to the making of the urban places we inhabit. In this course we examine how the architecture and design of cities is dependent on the underlying urban fabric by looking carefully at the forces that shape great urban spaces - the designers, the political players and the everyday urban dwellers. Contemporary projects ranging from The High Line in Manhattan to Germany's Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord are used as case-studies in conjunction with study of Boston's historical and contemporary urban landscape. Students' final projects for the course involve direct observation, analysis, and documentation of selected sites in Boston. Through the case studies and investigations in Boston, we critically assess the social, cultural, environmental, and economic factors that influence built and landscape fabric of cities and what the confluence of those underpinnings means for the future of the places where we live.

EDAD 720 Integrated Systems
Students explore strategies for enclosing buildings and examine how to integrate the building enclosure with its surrounding environment including framing, climate modification, and building services systems. Using their design from a prior studio as the basis for developing building enclosure systems, students will research and explore multiple building service/ environmental systems that complement their design in a sustainable context. This exploration includes how to evaluate, select, and coordinate the structural framing and commonly used building service and environmental systems in association with the building envelope and its details. Students use their projects to gain knowledge of these systems as well as discover how to coordinate the interface between dissimilar enclosure systems. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Arch. Structures I, II & III

EDAD 752 Architectural Design VIII
Students investigate multiple aspects of various building systems and regulatory requirement integration in the design process including structure, enclosure, environmental systems, codes, and material choices. 

Graduate Prerequisites: EDAD720 Integrated Systems; EDAD702 Architectural Design VII

EDAD 760 Thesis Preparation
Students explore principles of research design and applied research methods culminating in an accepted research proposal presentation and paper for the M.ARCH Thesis (EDAD-801/806 and EDAD-802/807). 

Graduate Prerequisites: EDAD516 & EDAD526 History of Architecture and Urban Planning I & II; EDAD605 Community /Build Studio; AD752 Architectural Design VIII - Comprehensive studio taken concurrently.

EDAD 805 Professional Practice II
Professional Practice II is a continuation of Professional Practice I (EDAD-535) and covers topics essential to the business of architecture. Among the topics addressed are basic business concepts for the successful operation of an architectural firm and office, project finance including accounting fundamentals, forms of business organization, employer-employee relationships, business taxation, project management, and managing risk and professional liability. This material is then viewed through the lens of the architect's fiduciary responsibilities through design, on the jobsite, and in practice, and in relation to the issues of professional ethics and social and environmental responsibility.

Graduate Prerequisite: EDAD535 Professional Practice I

EDAD 806 Thesis I
A major design issue of complexity and relevance to both the student and the current practice of architecture is proposed and undertaken during this two-course design sequence. EDAD801 represents the first semester of design. This course requires the student to develop and work toward completion of the design project that is used to answer the thesis question developed through research in EDAD760 Thesis Preparation. Students will meet regularly with the thesis advisor, and bi-weekly with the thesis coordinator as a group.

Graduate Prerequisite:  EDAD760 Thesis Preparation

EDAD 808 Thesis II

A continuation of EDAD801 Thesis I, this course requires the completion of the design project, exhibition in the graduate Thesis Show, and the completion of the thesis book, which is reviewed, edited and accepted by the thesis advisor, thesis coordinator, Head of Graduate Program in Architecture, and Assistant Dean of the Graduate Programs no later than December 15.  

Graduate Prerequisite: EDAD806 Thesis I

Elective Courses

These are sample courses offered within the Department of Architecture. With approval of an advisor, students may also choose electives from throughout the college and from the Professional Arts (ProArts) Consortium and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Architecture Design course will be assigned 500 level numbers for graduate students.  

EDAD 219 / EDAD 519 AutoCAD and Space Planning
Current professional and architectural design and drafting software is introduced in the context of space planning for domestic, educational, commercial, and industrial uses. The process of planning space is covered from interviewing the client, measuring and documenting existing space and equipment, understanding the needs of the users, applying building codes, ergonomic requirements, and accessibility laws, producing several logical preliminary schemes, to finally developing a partial set of working drawings for the scheme selected, using the 2D features of AutoCAD. Typical projects include interior space use, reflected ceiling, dimensions and details, material and color plans.

Graduate Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Computer literacy-previous experience with modeling and other programming recommended, but not required

Undergraduate Prerequisites: Computer literacy-previous experience with modeling and other programming recommended, but not required

EDAD 300X Design/Build/Artisanry
Development of technical drawing skills through exploration in various media using architectural or industrial design contexts. Introduces various drawing techniques. Attention is given to 3D material rendition, construction means, and form characteristics through measuring, documentation, and transformation into 2D drawing. Freehand and hard line drawing including plan, section, elevation, axonometric, isometric, and perspective. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: none

EDAD 301 Design Works at MassArt
Design Works is a multi-disciplinary critique and seminar class in current design/build topics. Invited experts in the design and research field provide background as well as project information, design briefs, and demonstrate skills in developing essential design tools. The class centers around a real project exercise based upon the actual needs of an educational, corporate, or community partner. Typical topics may include a range of interior and building design interventions—for example, a shared public space for the proposed new residence at the College, or a similar collective space. Semester to include field trips, student presentations of design projects, including plans, sections, elevations, renderings, and partial construction drawings of investigations. These projects may include modular details, kit of part construction, energy and sustainable design characteristics, analysis of precedent, daylighting and lighting principles, use of color, materials and assembly, furniture, and product design.  

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Open to freshmen with permission of instructor
 
EDAD 303 Lighting Design: First Light
First Light is a multi-disciplinary course in light and lighting design. Invited experts in the lighting and research field provide essential tools, background, and demonstrations in a lecture and presentation format, with the class culminating in a final project that solves a particular design issue. Each project is pre-selected based upon the actual needs of a corporate or community partner, and the students address specific component solutions that are covered in the course content. Typical topics include but are not limited to investigations of built form, analysis of precedent, daylighting, product design, line and low voltage systems, the science of light, experimentation of light as material, sustainability, lighting loads, solar energy systems, and physical applications. This course is open to all levels of students, with permission of the instructor, who are interested in light and relevant problem solving. Field trips to local lighting design centers, actual state of the art projects, fabrication shops, and research by local design firms included. Study models, drawings, research, and presentation boards in traditional and digital media. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Open to all levels with permission of the instructor

EDAD 304 Urban Architecture
This course introduces students to a broad range of current and historic theories while also introducing the means and methods of understanding and developing urban planning concepts for the city at the scale of the neighborhood. Material presented covers issues of urban design and city evolution, locally and globally, as well as the social, economic and political forces shaping urban life. Current topics in urban design are discussed including sustainable cities and the development of urban centers, information architecture, density, urban transport, and active communities. Related disciplines and policies relevant to urban projects are reviewed for a comprehensive investigation. Students will be required to develop schematic plans for a specific urban site or neighborhood, and through their research and understanding of the topics presented, cogently discuss their approach and design solutions. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Open to architecture majors who are juniors and above.

EDAD 307  Furniture Design I
This studio is designed as an introduction to the basic principles of furniture design as it relates to history, methods of production, and style. Through a series of projects, students design and construct projects focusing on material selection, joinery conventions of similar and different materials, and craft in assemblage. Students are encouraged to develop consistent formal elements in their designs, with attention to ease of use, function, assemblage, and workmanship.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD202 Methods and Materials, or 3DSC102 Technology and Culture, or permission of instructor

EDAD 311 Interior Architecture I
Students are introduced to the basic principles of interior architecture, seen as an extension of the built environment. Through documentation, research in modular frameworks, program interpretation, the nature of renovation, the interpretation of materials, and the development of color and texture assemblages, students are exposed to the processes of visual communication using a variety of forms. Interior spaces must satisfy both the artistic and functional requirements of place making for inhabitation. Projects require skills in form and program development, building systems, code requirements, and space planning. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: None

EDAD 312 Net Zero House
As a collaborative design intensive, students are invited from multiple disciplines in design and research to develop preliminary schematic designs for an affordable family house net-zero in energy use and constructed with sustainable materials. Designed in collaboration with students from the Solar Energy Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, the course (a five-course, year-round sequence) is the primary vehicle for students designing and building the solar house for the 2011 solar decathlon competition in Washington DC. Taught collaboratively by architects, sustainable engineers, and energy design professionals, the course will focus on a house of 1000 square feet that produces, stores and sells energy, powers its mechanical systems, collects waste and rainwater, and has high insulation values, while providing a "laboratory" framework for students to explore new concepts in sustainable design and construction. Students develop a website to display the course and competition process and outcomes, including marketing, fundraising, design systems, and fabrication of the house and its interior components and furnishings. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD223 Architectural Design. Students must be juniors or above in architecture or other related engineering programs.

EDAD 315 3D Computer Modeling
This course offers an exploration of form.Z for computer-aided designing and Photoshop for manipulation of images created with form.Z. It includes the investigation of a wide variety of applications of these skills. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: None

EDAD 321 Interior Architecture II
Students are introduced to the basic principles of interior architecture seen as an extension of the built environment. Through documentation, research in modular frameworks, program interpretation, renovation, and the development of material, color, and texture assemblages, projects expose students to understanding user requirements and program development as the basis for the design projects. Through a series of project designs, students develop familiarity with formal systems and their relationship to building systems, code requirements, and space planning. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD223 This course is the next in sequence for the Interior Architecture
program (This studio is required of all undergraduates in Interior Architecture)

EDAD 322 Interior Architecture III
Students are exposed to a design project of increasing complexity and scale with an investigation of a mixed-use program in an adaptive reuse building context. Students are exposed to design projects that incorporate sustainable design principles including materials selections, shared space programming, daylighting, energy conservation and use, and environmental systems that support their project concept. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD321 Interior Architecture II and EDAD317 Structural Design II

EDAD 330 The Art of Furniture Design I: Fundamentals of Design and Construction
In this course, students initiate and are guided through a hands-on design/build project based on fundamental tenets of furniture design. Students will come to class with work from Design Processes for Furniture Design to use as the basis for their project. This studio shop course will begin with a review of design fundamentals and the concept design process. If necessary, concepts are refined through additional drawings and maquette model making as preparation for the concluding phase: completion of the final product. This class will also be open to students outside of the certificate program who have experience in basic hand tool use and maintenance as well as a comfort level for work in standing machine power tools. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Design Processes for Furniture Design

EDAD 340 The Art of Furniture Design II: Fundamentals of Design and Construction
In this course, students initiate and are guided through a hands-on design/build project based on fundamental tenets of furniture design. Students will come to class with work from Design Processes for Furniture Design to use as the basis for their project. This studio shop course will begin with a review of design fundamentals and the concept design process. If necessary, concepts are refined through additional drawings and maquette model making as preparation for the concluding phase: completion of the final product. This class will also be open to students outside of the certificate program who have experience in basic hand tool use and maintenance as well as a comfort level for work in standing machine power tools. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: The Art of Furniture Design: Fundamentals of Design and Construction I

EDAD 350 Building Components and Details
This course investigates the nature of construction material and the inherent ways that materials behave and to use these properties in small-scale design studies. Construction assemblies studied for their logic and design opportunities. Use industry conventions such as dimensioning and material constraints in designs to develop projects through drawing, models, and building actual details. The work is developed in architectural, interior, and industrial design contexts. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in EDAD223 Architectural Design I and EDAD202 Methods and Materials. This course is required of all undergraduates in the program and provides a means for undergraduates to design and explore constructed building details.

EDAD 356 Exhibit Design
The intent of this class is to discover and explore the basic principles of designing exhibits including structural frameworks, ergonomics, scale, graphics, and an exploration of materials, form, and fabrication. Students are exposed to concepts of time and the multiple types of display for selling, celebrations, fairs, expositions, and markets. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Open to all majors, limited spaces will be reserved for freshmen.

EDAD 360 Furniture Fabrication for a Sustainable Future
This course combines the fine art of furniture making with state of the industry design and fabrication techniques. Students develop their woodworking skills in fabrication, material selection, joinery, and the design of modular systems. Beginning with a set of individually generated or group designs, each student is responsible for creating a built piece that represents an understanding of efficiency, sustainability, and incorporates a range of possible uses: for living, learning, and work spaces. The context for the project is the proposed 1000 SF Solar Decathlon house currently under development by Team Massachusetts—a joint project with MassArt and UMass Lowell. The individual student-built pieces are to be exhibited along with the completed house on the National Mall in Washington, DC, scheduled for September 2011. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Prior woodshop experience

EDAD 391 Rendering
Architectural rendering using traditional and digital media of interior and exterior views of the built environment for all students of architecture and interior architecture. Course includes a particular focus on developing sections and using drawing to understand the building envelope. Students work with various media, techniques, in black and white and color to produce renderings from actual sites, photographs, drawings, and plans. Shadows, material delineation, texture, perspective, and axonometric techniques are discussed. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Open to architecture majors who are juniors and above.

EDAD 3X5 Berlin: Cutting-edge Contemporary Architecture and Public Art
This elective studio will lead students on a ten-day study tour of Berlin, the capital of Germany, and provide opportunity for cross-disciplinary, collaborative, project-based learning. Study emphasis will be placed on recent developments in architecture and public art following the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. The educational theme will particularly stress sustainable architecture and design, because there is substantial new development that showcases best practices, and the most advanced work in sustainability is occurring in Europe. The Berlin program will consist of three main components: 1) visit and study important sites of contemporary architecture, public art, and planning; 2) meet with professionals in the fields of public art and architecture; and 3) create a hands-on, interdisciplinary, collaborative art project. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: none

EDAD 598 Architecture Internship
Graduate Prerequisite: Advisor approval 

EDAD 404 /  Advanced Lighting/City Lights
The course content is set in the city (in streets, parks or walkways). Our "public sector" includes the effects of exterior lighting schemes of private buildings. It proposes to examine the effects of lighting from an ecological perspective including the management of consumption through reductions in energy use, renewable energy sources, reductions in lighting pollution, and a review of damage of lighting to ecological systems—flora and fauna. This course proposes to explore themes of sustainability and globalization through human interaction with light, color, and form. What should the role of light be in the public realm, and how shall lighting interventions be structured in the future of the city? What recommendations can be made for today's cities? Through research in new directions in city lighting coupled with advances in lighting types, management, conservation, and reduction in use and level, as well as ecological impact of illumination, students will propose a new paradigm for city light. This course will be co-taught by an architectural design faculty member (licensed architect) and a professional lighting designer (IALD - International Association of Lighting Designers member). 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: none

EDAD 407 Furniture Design II
This studio is designed as a continuation of projects covering many of the principles of Furniture I with an emphasis on more independent projects.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD202 Methods and Materials or 3DSC102 Technology and Culture, or permission of instructor  

EDAD 411 Interior Architecture IV
Interior Architecture IV includes projects of increasing complexity, emphasizing understanding space as the essence of place. The course provides a framework for design decisions related to complex programs, systems, and planning of public and private large-scale interior spaces.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: EDAD322  

EDAD 440 Intermediate Furniture Design: Pre-Capstone Studio
Working with greater autonomy in the shop environment, each student develops a more advanced design project in consultation with faculty. The project will be based on students' ongoing practice of concept documentation and idea development in their sketchbooks, and focused on continued evolution of individual vision and practice. Practical issues such as rapid decision making and timely procurement of materials are incorporated into the design/build process. This course may be combined with the Art of Furniture class depending upon enrollment. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: none

EDAD 441 Furniture Design Capstone
This is the culmination of a five-semester concentration on the development of studio furniture. Students are required to produce a significant work of merit—a furniture suite, or a series of pieces—in order to successfully complete the capstone course. The expectation is for the student to produce work which is a cohesive representation of his or her individual aesthetic voice and vision. As such, the final work will be the defining element of the emerging artist's portfolio as the student moves into professional practice. 

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Undergraduate Prerequisite: Intermediate Furniture Design: Pre-Capstone studio

EDAD 599 Independent Study - Architecture
Topics and descriptions determined by student and faculty. A minumum of 6 meetings are required.

EDAD 603 Graduate Seminars - Architecture
Topics and descriptions TBD

EDAD 785 Sustainable Site Design
This course is a guided experience through site context issues within the current sustainable design guidelines being asked of and imposed upon restoration or new development projects. It is meant to have designers evaluate and understand these guidelines with the purpose of the enhancement of a project in light of natural and social systems. A component of this understanding is the learning of a ‘language' with which to communicate with other sustainable design team members whether of the regulatory, design, ecological, technological, or construction fields (i.e.; federal, state, and local agencies; building and land architects; ecologists; energy consultants; and development contractors) As a sub-topic, this course will marry the science with the art of place and place-making.

Architecture History Electives 

HART 257 Islamic Art and Architecture
Beginning with an introduction to the religion of Islam, the course will survey the field of Islamic Arts and Architecture between 650 AD to 1650 AD. The survey will cover a range from mosques to markets, from citadels to cemeteries, with the emphasis upon function and meaning rather than on chronology and style. Material culture of the Muslim world will be viewed as it is informed by the religious tenets of Islam. Working thematically, the class will survey the refined and exquisite arts of porcelain, enamel, manuscript illumination, metalwork, calligraphy, textiles displayed in the Asian collection at the Museum of Fine Arts.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 258 Early Islamic Art and Architecture, 690-1250
This course will survey the field of Islamic Art and Architecture from its origins to the beginning of the Mughal dynasty, through the architecture, metalwork, ivory, ceramics, calligraphy, miniature painting, and ornament created for both public and private spheres. Great mosques, palaces, and urban planning will be studied, as will luxury arts and ornament for religious and secular contexts within the traditions of Arab and Muslim culture.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 273 American Architecture: From Thomas Jefferson to Frank Gehry
This course will trace the evolution of American architecture from the country's earliest days to recent years. It will explore how national identity, landscape, and history have factored into the creation of a uniquely American architectural dialogue. The course will engage primary source texts and local sites to illustrate the nuances of important themes.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 286 Modern Architecture
An investigation of the designed and built environment, from the end of the 19th Century to the present day. This course examines the influence of technology, aesthetics, politics, social history, and economics on modern architecture and urban planning, including the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, international modernism of the 1920s to the 1960s, Post-Modernism, Deconstructivism, and worldwide contemporary theory and practice.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 320 Villas and Gardens of the Italian Renaissance
An investigation of the architecture of leisure in Renaissance Italy, from the early Humanist villas of the powerful Medici family to the farm-villa complexes designed by Palladio in the sixteenth century. Gardens and villas are considered in their role as purveyors of the economic, social and political power of the elite, and in relation to ancient literary and archeological sources and Renaissance design theory. Examples include the Medici ville at Fiesole, Palazzo Te in Mantua, Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola and Villa d'Este at Tivoli.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 373 Architecture of Boston
This course will explore the evolution of Boston's architectural landscape from Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Challenging the common adage that "Boston's streets were laid out by cows," the course will identify the local geographical, industrial, and social factors that uniquely shaped Boston's development, and will situate the city's growth within the context of larger national trends. Topics will include individual neighborhoods, as well as celebrated architects like Charles Bulfinch, H.H. Richardson, and Ralph Adams Cram. Primary-source texts and local site visits will supplement in-class mastery of material.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 397 Architecture and Politics
Selected topics in the relationship between political power and built form in the West, from ancient Greece to the present. Students investigate the influence of political agendas on building typology and style, and the use of architecture as political propaganda. Topics include the architecture of imperialism, state-subsidized housing, and the politics of urban planning.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

HART 411 Gothic Architecture: Great Cathedrals of Europe
An in-depth look at the medieval Gothic architecture of Europe, focusing on selected cathedrals from the earliest examples around 12th century Paris to the fanciful stonework and towering spires of 15th century England and Central Europe. Following an overview of the period and its monuments, students will undertake individual research projects with the professor's guidance and will share their progress and conclusions with one another. The course is designed to provide students with tools for professional and/or graduate work in the field of art history. Preference will be given to art history majors.

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Undergraduate Prerequisite: HART100

EDAD 500 Re-thinking Architectural Heritage
The course provides an overview of the key theoretical standpoints on values and meanings of architectural heritage, as well as concrete examples of methods, techniques, and materials developed within the field of historic preservation from the institutionalization of the discipline in the 19th century until present. Along with the close insight into the foremost themes and problems probed by 19th and early 20th century thinkers, such as Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, and Riegl, the course examines the development of European and American preservationist doctrines tied to the international organizations such as World Heritage Centre, ICCROM, ICOMOS, and DocoMoMo. The emphasis in the course is given to changing methodologies which have shifted the notion of a ‘particular monument' towards the concept of ‘cultural landscapes'. The course contents are presented through the specific themes which have remained crucial for understanding the link between heritage and collective identity (civic, national, ethnic, racial, gender). Through lectures combined with seminar discussions on distinguished theoretical text, the students are urged to start rethinking preservation as a powerful cultural practice that could create alternative futures for the built domain.

HART 586 Modern and Contemporary Architecture History and Theory
An in-depth examination of world architecture and urban planning from the beginning of the 19th century to the present. Students will become familiar with the major formal and structural systems of world architecture of the last two centuries and will examine the ways in which politics, economics, patronage, and technology, as well as issues relating to sustainability, have influenced the modern and contemporary built world. In addition, students will become conversant in the literature of criticism and theory of the period in question. The format of the course is lecture/discussion, and features a substantial writing component, in which students will be responsible for exam essays, written responses to readings, and a cogent critique of a building and/or urban design.